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Author Topic: How to Workshop  (Read 727 times)

Viola Ross

    (03/30/2016 at 18:44)
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Summer Writing Workshops
A Guide

Welcome to the summer writing workshop! Whether you're a returning Hoggies member looking to brush up on some skills or a shiny new one that's just getting feet wet, this is the place to try your hand at tackling more technical aspects of writing. Before we jump in though, below are a few things to keep in mind:
  • Try something new! - We're all here writing for fun, and here we're hoping to get discussion as well as a chance to stretch the kinds of writing we can do.
  • Stay positive! - No one here is The Expert on writing, and your writing is all your own. If you're contributing to the discussion or critiquing someone's piece, start with what you liked or agreed with and keep all comments constructive.
  • Receiving critiques - Just because someone said it here doesn't mean you have to follow every critique to the letter. Take what you need and the rest with a grain of salt.
  • Think improvement - You will not be a pro at writing OR workshopping right away! Hopefully we'll have some experienced writers and workshoppers to use as examples.
  • R-E-S-P-E-C-T - What works for Aretha Franklin works here as well!

Occasionally, a workshop will be run a little bit differently with areas of discussion and mini-challenges instead of straight writing prompts. Never fear though! If you have any questions, all you have to do is PM, and hope to see you in a workshop soon!



All credit for this overview goes to the perpetually lovely J. Walsingham.



Viola Ross

    (03/30/2016 at 19:16)
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Writing & Submitting Your Piece

There aren't really any rules for participating in workshop prompts - the point is to stretch your writing capability and improve! Each prompt will have some guidelines for you to follow to get the creative juices flowing, of course, but there are only a couple things we ask. The first is that you use the following title format when posting your piece:

Prompt [Number]: Title of Your Piece

For example, your post title might look like this:

Prompt 3: Wind in the Willows

That way, members who come to give you some critique will know which prompt you've written to!

When receiving critiques, take everything with a grain of salt. You do not need to make every change that is suggested. What you want to focus on is: did your intended meaning get across to the reader? If yes, yay! If not, think about the critiques and see if anyone's suggestion or problem areas could be looked at.

After you've gotten some helpful critique of your piece, you're more than welcome to respond to your thread with a revised version of the piece. This is optional, but encouraged - revision and peer review are important parts of the creative process! Once you're satisfied with your work, move on to another prompt!

The only other thing we ask is that you please do not post WIP pieces. Please only post once the piece is ready for critique!



« Last Edit: 04/01/2016 at 15:11 by Viola Ross »

Viola Ross

    (03/30/2016 at 19:28)
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Critiquing Others' Writing

Critiquing of your fellow members' workshop submissions is heavily encouraged - it will generate discussion and give participants an outside perspective on their work. If you don't know where to start, here's a brief guide!

1. Summarize what the piece is about. This will evaluate your perception of the piece so the writer knows if he/she is doing a good job. The summary should only be one sentence long, a "TV Guide version," if you will. (This may not be applicable for everything we do. Just keep it in mind!)

2. Be positive! Start with what you liked about the piece. Avoid general phrases, like "it was good," or "I like that sentence." Try and get a little detailed. Say "I loved this sentence! This wording here really described the character in blahblahblah!"

3. Once you've said what you liked about the piece, think critically about it. What would improve the piece? Did anything confuse you? Whenever you point out something you don't like, try and say why you would change it, and give a suggestion for what to do to improve it.

4. Give a generalized review. What was your overall opinion of it? This is where the writer will receive the opinion of "I liked it" or "It needs improvement." If you would like to get specific in this section, you may, or you can keep it fairly general.


Disclaimer; I stole this from EdMa, who stole it from Bru, who wrote it over at oldsite. xoxo.


« Last Edit: 03/30/2016 at 19:31 by Viola Ross »

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